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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and that's starting in half-hour. then rebekah brooks who used to run murdoch's british newspaper empire until last week will answer questions. a limited number of the public are being allowed in. people were lined up at 7:00 a.m. and the line stretched around the block trying to get a seat. the police are still also under allegation of corruption. this story has so many 10 kals, many threads of inquiry even as it involves police involvement. a news of the word reporter was found dead in his home yesterday. sean was the man who originally blew the whistle on his knowledge -- his allegation that former editor of the world andy coulson was very aware of phone hacking and encouraged it. that allegation is something coulson has denied. bill there are when the testimony from mr. murdoch and his son james get underway we'll take you to that room in london, england. jamie: we are just getting word that the fbi is searching homes of the suspected hacker group anonymous. the target said to be in their late teens to early 20s. we are told the hacking group inspired by wikileaks has defaced web sit
of it that the "news of the world" was sacrificed in order to try and protect rebekah brooks' position at news international. but in effect rather than her being -- her departure being announced, "news of the world" was offered up as an alternative to try to deal with the whole thing. do you regret now making that decision? do you regret closing the "news of the world" to try and save rebekah brooks? in hindsight do you wish you'd accepted her resignation to start with, in order that that paper with a fine tradition could probably continue and all of the people who are now out of work could still be in work? >> i regret very much the fate of people who will not be able to find work. the two decisions were totally unrelated. absolutely and totally unrelated. >> so when you came into the u.k. and said your priority was rebekah brooks -- >> i'm not sure i did say that. i was quoted as saying that. i walked outside my flat and had about 20 microphones stuck in my mouth so i'm not sure what i said. >> so you were misquoted? >> i'm not saying that. i just don't remember. >> i'm sorry, mr. chairman.
on the face of it, that the news of the world was sacrificed in order to try and protect rebekah brooks' position at news international >> i advocated at the time that this was a step we should take. this was a paper and a title that had fundamentally violated the trust of its readers, and it's something that was a matter of great regret, real gravity, but under the circumstances, and with respect to the bad things that certain of the things that happened at the "american's "nee world" some years ago, it was the right choice for the paper to cease publication. it is important to note and i want to be clear with the committee on this. that the company is doing everything it can to make sure that journalists and staff at the "news of the world" who had nothing to do with any of these issues, who are completely blameless in any of these things, and many are, you know, really have done tremendous work journalistically, that we find reemployment for them anywhere we k. the company is being as generous as we can under the circumstances. the company is being as thoughtful and compassionate for
to the number three spot in the company. and then there is rebekah brooks, a rupert murdoch protege. she was a top executive before she resigned on friday. she was arrested a couple of days later. let's get straight to london to atika shubert. these witnesses are not under subpoena. they don't have to say a word, do they? >> no. they don't, but it's still a court and can be held in tempt of court for example. even though there is no particular oath here, there is an incredible amount of pressure on them to answer these questions. remember, particularly in the cases of james murdoch and rebekah brooks, they have told lawmakers in previous hearings the this was the end of it. it was a rogue reporter and a private investigator and that was the end of it. clearly, it was not. because it turns out that there are, in fact, thousands of phone mail messages that may have been hacked and now they are back in front of lawmakers again trying to explain why they didn't tell the full story the first time around. >> atika, we have been paying close attention to this since early this morning. you know
am aware of that mr. brooks or mr. heaton had knowledge of. certainly her knowledge of those things has not been clear. i have seen no evidence of impropriety. >> [unintelligible] is that right? >> yes. >> in october of 2010, did you still believe it when you said you would vigorously pursue the truth? >> yes. >> if you were not worrying bend? >> i do not know. >> you acknowledge they you were misled? >> yes. >> are you aware that in march [unintelligible] police? >> i was not aware at the time. it had been amended. >> if you were anyone else in the organization? investigating it at the time? explaining why? >> let me say something. this is not an excuse. this is less than 1% of the company. distinguished people and professionals. >> [unintelligible] what i am trying to establish is paca how your wrongdoing was -- establish is how your wrongdoing was established at the time. were you made aware of [unintelligible] >> [unintelligible] >> what did they do, subsequent to the arrest? >> i told the investigators and eventually they investigated further. >> what did you do to investigate
in order to try to protect rebekah brooks' position at news international. in effect, rather than her being -- having her departure being announced, "the news of the world" was offered up as an alternative to try to deal with the whole thing. do you regret now making that decision? do you regret closing "the news of the world" to try and save rebekah brooks? in hindsight, do you wish you accepted her resignation to start with in order that that paper with a fine tradition could probably continue and all of the people who are now out of work could still be in work? >> i regret very much the pain of people that will not be able to find work. the two decisions were totally unrelated, absolutely sxl totally unrelated. >> so when you came into the uk and said your priority for rebekah brooks -- >> i'm not sure i said that. i was quoted as saying that. i had about 20 microphones stuck in my mouth, so i'm not sure what i said. >> you were misquoted? >> i'm not saying that. i just don't remember. >> i think it's important -- i'm sorry, mr. chairman. >> yes. >> mr. davis, it's important to know the
than 100"÷"÷ million homes."÷"÷ created by cable, provided as a÷ public service."÷"÷ >>> rebecca brooks, the former"÷ chief executive of news"÷"÷ international, testified earlie÷ this week before a house of"÷"÷ commons committee. she"÷"÷ was questioned on her knowledge of phone hacking at"÷÷ "news of the world," alleged"÷"÷ payments made to police officers and to celebrity victims of"÷"÷ hacking. she was"÷"÷ also asked about"÷"÷ tampering with the voicemail of a teenage murder victim. >> we've now come to the second part of our session. i'd like to welcome ms. be rebecca brooks, recent chief executive officer at news international, and i'd like to thank you for your willingness to come before the committee. we are very much aware there is an ongoing police investigation which could lead to further proceedings, and we will bear that in mind, but we also appreciate your statement when you resigned from the company that you wanted to be as helpful as possible to various inquiries that are underway. could i just start then. news international issued a statement when you we
of pieces of that and told me he became a suspect. >> you were told rebecca brooks would be arrested? >> yes. >> how long before? >> 80 ten days? >> two days? >> i can't remember. but that is entirely proper. >> can we stick to resignations? [talking over each other] [inaudible] >> i was simply trying to ensure that the exchanges between the employment of mr. coulson, why would i want to risk anyone being accused of any compromise? i would not suggest for one moment -- why would i risk that compromise? my understanding is the advice from the senior official in number 10 and it is very sensible not to compromise people or leave a suggestion of compromise? >> it is not a question of keeping it secret from the home secretary. as commissioner of the metropolitan police, very substantial salary, you have great responsibilities and your predecessors had to tell the prime minister a lot of unpleasant things for many years. why is it this was a matter that you felt was something that you couldn't disclose? >> we were it is negative. let me remind you, wallace becoming a name in regards to packing, f
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)